ENME

ENES 102 - Mechanics I

3 Credits

Textbook 

Dally, Bonenberger, and Fourney, Mechanics I – Statics+++, eBook Version, 2015-2016, College House Enterprises, 2015, ISBN 978-1-935673-25-5

Description 

  • The equilibrium of stationary bodies under the influence of   various kinds of forces. Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium, trusses, frames and machines, centroids, moment of inertia, beams, friction, stress/strain, material properties. Vector and scalar methods are used to solve problems.
  • Requirement for the following UMCP engineering programs: Aerospace Engineering; Bioengineering; Civil and Environmental Engineering; Fire Protection Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering; Mechanical Engineering.

Goals 

The student will develop and/or refine their knowledge in the following areas:
  • Engineering problem formulation, organization, and solution methodologies
  • Scalar and vector methods applied to forces and moments
  • Centroids and moments of inertia for plane areas
  • Static equilibrium of bodies – 2D and 3D
  • Stresses and deflections in rods
  • Material properties and failure
  • Column analysis
  • Structural analysis of trusses, frames, and machines
  • Frictional forces and analysis

Topics 

  • Engineering problem formulation, organization, and solution methodologies
  • Scalar/trigonometric methods applied to forces and moments
  • Vector analysis applied to forces and moments
  • Centroids for plane areas
  • Static equilibrium of bodies – 2D and 3D
  • Stresses and deflections in rods
  • Material properties and failure
  • Structural analysis of trusses, frames, and machines
  • Frictional forces and analysis

Learning Outcomes 

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Class/Laboratory Schedule 

The University of Maryland follows the Maryland Higher Education Commission's policies on "contact hours;" specifically, one semester hour of credit will be awarded for a minimum of 15 hours, of 50 minutes each of actual class time, exclusive of registration, study days, and holidays.


Last Updated By 
Robert Bonenberger, June 2017